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The Wise Fool

I enjoyed your post, here. Greenburg, Koufax, and Green's actions were definitely more respectable than Tebowing, which really does seem to be a mockery of what the faith should be.

Regarding atheists not firing back with Matthew 6:5, that would be interesting, and it is slightly surprising that none have. But in the U.S.A., we are still fighting controversies over public prayer in schools, so singling out Tebow and others praying on the field perhaps is not as obvious a thing to do. Plus, many atheists grew up with religious backgrounds, where prayer in public is common. I mean, you could even use Matthew 6:5 as an argument for why you should not pray in church, but who would take such a stand? Public/group prayer was carried out very soon after Jesus' death, such as we see in Acts 1:14, yet there was never a time I remember in the Gospels where Jesus held a group prayer session with the Disciples. And if you were to tweak the meaning ever-so-slightly, you could even argue that Philippians 4:6 is in support of Tebowing.

To tell you the truth, I am somewhat surprised it has taken this long for something like Tebowing to catch on in sports. The Grammy winners have been doing it for decades, starting their acceptance speeches with "First and foremost, I want to thank the Lord, Jesus Christ, my Savior..."

tom sheepandgoats

Jesus did publicly offer thanks to God before feeding the crowds. Acts 1:14 relates believers persisting in prayer during an especially trialsome time for them.

I think common sense can reign here. If we have an activity/event overtly spiritual in nature or purpose, one person might well represent those present in a public prayer. Whatever the occasion for prayer, in some way God's will or purposes ought to be involved. He doesn't care about sports, or at least, taking part in them has nothing to do with godly devotion.

The Wise Fool

Indeed, let common sense reign! :-) (I hope I didn't come across as suggesting anything to the contrary.)

Sorry for the Acts 1:14 reference, that seems to be a translation version issue. Better examples might be Acts 1:24 and Acts 4:24-31.

"He doesn't care about sports, or at least, taking part in them has nothing to do with godly devotion."

Well put!

Ralf Fuschtei

Think about oversized prayers.

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